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"[Arms Control Today] has become indispensable! I think it is the combination of the critical period we are in and the quality of the product. I found myself reading the May issue from cover to cover."

– Frank von Hippel
Co-Director of Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University
June 1, 2018
About ACA

Addressing the Disarmament Deficit

Inside the Arms Control Association October 2021 This week (Oct. 24-29) marks United Nations Disarmament Week, which seeks to promote awareness and a better understanding of disarmament issues. The annual observance was first called for at the UN’s 1978 special session on disarmament. Since we were founded 50 years ago, the Arms Control Association has been a leading force pushing, prodding, and promoting effective action on arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament—every day of every week, every year. We’ve made a difference—but nuclear competition and global tensions are growing once...

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A Good Start, But Serious Challenges Lay Ahead

Inside the Arms Control Association July 2021 For nearly a decade, the nuclear arms control and disarmament process has been at a standstill, spending on nuclear weapons has risen to obscene levels and competition between nuclear-armed states has been accelerating. As a result, the risk of nuclear war is increasing. In response, the Arms Control Association has been working to get the U.S. and other major powers to step back from the nuclear brink. We’re making some progress - even as we deal with an unexpected new challenge . At their June 16 summit, President Joe Biden and President...

Biden and Putin Summit: A Chance to Move Back from the Brink

This week’s summit meeting in Geneva is a pivotal opportunity for the leaders of the world’s two largest nuclear weapons possessors to reduce the growing risk of nuclear conflict and get back on track to reduce their bloated nuclear stockpiles. For months and weeks, we’ve been working hard to highlight and explain what can be done on strategic stability and arms control and to build political support for meaningful post-summit follow-through actions by President Biden and President Putin. Last week, our board chair Tom Countryman and I met with NSC staff at the White House and delivered a...

2021 Arms Control Association Board of Directors Election

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Dear Member of the Association,

In a "normal" year, we would be reaching out about our in-person Annual Meeting, but it has certainly not been a normal year and we are all still struggling to cope with the devastating coronavirus pandemic.

Our 2021 Annual Meeting, which will be held this coming October, will be conducted online.

We are currently planning to host a hybrid, in-person and online, event in early 2022 where we will celebrate 50 years of Arms Control Association accomplishments and rededicate ourselves to the work that still lies ahead. We look forward to seeing many of you then.

Board of Directors Election: Please Vote!

In the meantime, all members are invited to vote by mail on the proposed slate of candidates for the 2021-2023 Class of Board of Directors Members. We have four current Board members who have agreed to continue to serve on the Board if approved by the membership.

Please see below the biographies of this year's candidates and the ballot. Cast your vote by June 30, 2021. Please note that if you also vote by returning the ballot you have received by postal mail, your vote will only be counted once.

If you have any questions about this year's board election, please contact Kathy Crandall Robinson, Chief Operating Officer, at 202-463-8270.

 


 

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Arms Control ‘David’ v Nuclear Lobby ‘Goliath’

Since the Arms Control Association was founded in 1971, we have taken on some consequential issues. Despite being a small organization, we have been able to punch above our weight class and make a difference by catalyzing action, informing better policy decisions, and holding decision-makers accountable to reduce the dangers posed by the world’s most dangerous weapons. Now, we are in a battle with the powerful "ICBM Lobby" over the size and the scope of the proposed $1.7 trillion U.S. nuclear weapons modernization program. Bill Hartung writes in an article in the forthcoming issue of Arms...

Become a Scoville Fellow with the Arms Control Association

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The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship pays a stipend for college graduates to work with DC-based nongovernmental organizations such as the Arms Control Association on arms control, peace, and security issues for six to nine months. 

ACA's executive director Daryl Kimball, policy director Kingston Reif, and policy director Kelsey Davenport are each former Scoville Fellows. 

Since the inception of the Scoville Fellowship in 1987, which was established in honor of former ACA President Herbert Scoville Jr., the Arms Control Association has hosted and helped launch the careers of 12 fellows.

Those who got their start in the program at ACA include Maggie Tennis (2017); Elizabeth Philipp (2015-2016); Kelsey Davenport (2011-2012); Cole Harvey (2009); Alex Bolfrass (2007); Claire Applegarth (2004-2005); Asma Kahn (2002-2003); Philipp Bleek (1999-2000); Lara Cantuti (1994); Arthur Atkins (1994); and Felicia J. Wong (1988).

We are pleased to be currently hosting Sang-Min Kim, a recent graduate of University of California at Berkeley, as a 2021 Scoville Fellow.

For further information on the Scoville Fellowship Program, and to apply, please visit http://www.scoville.org.

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Launch your career in arms control as a Scoville Fellow at the Arms Control Association.

Pressing for Progress on Nonproliferation

The Arms Control Association team remains in the thick of the debate over how and why the United States and Iran should return to compliance with the historic 2015 nuclear deal. Since President Trump withdrew from the deal in 2018 and reimposed U.S. sanctions, Iran has retaliated by taking steps to ramp up its nuclear program and, in the process, has exceeded key limits set by the agreement. Both governments say they want to return to compliance, but they have not yet agreed as to how. With each passing day, the window of opportunity to avert a renewed nuclear crisis is narrowing. As I told...

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