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"...the Arms Control Association [does] so much to keep the focus on the issues so important to everyone here, to hold our leaders accountable to inspire creative thinking and to press for change. So we are grateful for your leadership and for the unyielding dedication to global nuclear security."

– Lord Des Browne
Vice Chairman, Nuclear Threat Initiative
October 20, 2014
CTBT at the RevCon

Arms Control NOW


The CTBT, as a key tenet of the nonproliferation regime, has been a noticeable part of the conversation at this month's NPT Review Conference in New York. Below is an index of opening statements from countries that cite the CTBT as a requirement of reinvigorating the NPT:


“The NAM States Parties strongly urges this Review Conference to clearly and categorically reject the policies of nuclear deterrence and place a ban on all forms of nuclear weapon testing with a view to their total elimination. To that end, the Review Conference should call for a timeframe with the list of specific actions for the implementation of Article VI, and a mechanism to verify the compliance of the Nuclear Weapons States with their obligations. It is vital that the international community to adopt an action plan with benchmarks and timeframe for the “how” to realize the objective of a world free of nuclear weapons.”
-H.E. Dr. R.M. Marty M. Natalegawa, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Indonesia, on behalf of the NAM States Parties, May 3, 2010.

“The Comprehensive Test ban Treaty (CTBT) is a crucial complement to the NPT. It must come into force. This is one of the 13 Practical Steps agreed upon by [sic] during the 2000 Review Conference, and this Review Conference must support the drive toward this critical objective.”
-H.E. Dr. Alberto G. Romulo, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Philippines, May 3, 2010

“A further issue of concern is that the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty has yet to enter into force. I urge the nine remaining Annex 2 States to ratify the treaty immediately and unconditionally.”
-Micheál Martin, T.D., Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ireland, May 3, 2010.

“Within the new EU Council Decision, we have identified the following priorities that we consider should be addressed by States Parties at this 2010 Review Conference…achieving rapid entry into force of the CTBT…”
- H.E. Catherine Ashton, High Representative of the European Union of Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, May 3, 2010.

“Spain welcomes the commitment of the U.S. administration to the early ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and may this new attitude encourage other countries that have not yet done so to accede to the treaty.”
- H.E. Don Miguel Ángel Moratinos, Minister of External Affairs and Cooperation, Spain, May 3, 2010.

“We have made a commitment to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty…”
- Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, United States, May 3, 2010.

“Brazil welcome conceptual advances in the US Nuclear Posture Review, mainly in relation to negative security assurances and in regard to the commitment by the US Government to seek ratification of the CTBT.”
-H.E. Mr. Celso Amorim, Minister of External Relations, Brazil, May 3, 2010.

“Forty years of NPT produced resolutions and decisions, high hopes and aspirations – and year, we are still waiting…for the entry-into-force of the Test-Ban-Treaty…I hope the improved atmosphere will enable progress at this Conference: real, concrete steps forward – especially as regards [to]…the nuclear test ban…”
-H.E. Mr. Michael Spindelegger, Foreign Minister, Austria, May 3, 2010.

“As a coordinator with France on the implementation of the Final declaration of the Article XIV conference, held last year in New York, Morocco reiterates its call for practical measures to ensure an early entry into force of the Complete [sic] Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. Morocco calls on countries listed in Annex II to ratify, without delay, this Treaty, which is of a crucial importance to disarmament and non-proliferation.”
-H.E. Taib Fassi Fihri, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Morocco, May 3, 2010.

“Entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) would be a major step forward for disarmament. Australia urges states that have yet to do so to sign and ratify the CTBT.”
- Mr. Stephen Smith, Foreign Minister, Australia, May 3, 2010.

“In the run-up to today we saw a series of remarkable achievements…a renewed commitment by President Obama to seek ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)…”
-H.E. Mr. Nickolay Mladenov, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Bulgaria, May 3, 2010.

“Hence, I wish to inform the present august assembly that Indonesia is initiating the process of the ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. It is our fervent hope that this further demonstration of our commitment to the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation agenda will encourage other countries that have not ratified the treaty, to do the same.”
- H.E. Dr. R.M. Marty M. Natalegawa, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Indonesia, May 3, 2010.

“We also strongly hope that the renewed commitment of key states regarding the ratification of the CTBT will allow us to finally realize the long standing goal of its entry into force.”
-H.E. Mr. Kostyantyn Gryshchenko, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Ukraine, May 4, 2010.

“The first of [the treaty’s] three core objectives is non-proliferation – the most immediate challenge we need to address. We believe the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty can serve as a key complementary document to the NPT. Serbia therefore warmly welcomes Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s initiative to host a ministerial meeting to bring it into force as soon as possible.”
-H.E. Mr. Vuk Jeremić, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Serbia, May 4, 2010.

“My country, with her impeccable disarmament and non-proliferation record, is committed to the pursuit of universal adherence to the NPT; and also to the CTBT. Bangladesh has unconditionally opted to remain non-nuclear by choice. It is the first Annex-2 country from South Asia to ratify the CTBT…We stress that non-nuclear states parties to the NPT have alegitimate right to receive unconditional assurances from the Nuclear Weapons States that the latter will not use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against them. It is a matter of concern that the nuclear weapon States are not only adding more precision capability to the existing stockpiles of nuclear weapons, but are also developing new types of weaponry. These are in contravention of the assurances provided by the nuclear weapon States at the time of concluding the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.”
- Dr. Dipu Moni, MP, Foreign Minister of Bangladesh, May 4, 2010.

“The persistent delays noted in the process of entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and the establishment of the Organization of the States Parties in Vienna, are also a source of great concern.”
-H.E. Mr. Mourad Medelci, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Algeria, May 4, 2010.

“There are other developments outside the Treaty framework that would contribute significantly to the Treaty's objectives. I encourage all to do their utmost to ensure the entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)…”
- H.E. Ms. Lene Espersen, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Denmark, May 4, 2010.

“Given the history of nuclear testing, Forum members attach great importance to the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Since the last NPT Review Conference several additional Forum members the Cook Islands, Vanuatu, the Marshall Islands and Palau have all ratified the Treaty.

We encourage ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, particularly by Annex 2 states, to enable entry into force as soon as possible. And we welcome the commitment by some states to do so, including our good friend and neighbour Indonesia.

Every ratification is a step towards universalisation and further strengthens the international norm against nuclear testing.”
- Mr. Stephen Smith, Foreign Minister of Australia on behalf of the Pacific Islands Forum, May 4, 2010.

“We continue to call for nuclear reductions leading to the elimination of nuclear arsenals, the negotiation of a fissile material treaty, the lowered operational readiness of nuclear weapon systems, security assurances and the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. We call for a diminished role for nuclear weapons in security policies which goes hand in hand with reducing the demand for them.

The announcement yesterday that Indonesia is initiating the process of ratifying the Test Ban Treaty is a cause for celebration. We would urge others especially those that are Annex 2 States to ratify the Treaty as a matter of priority.”
- Hon. Georgina Te Heuheu, Minister for Disarmament and Arms Control, New Zealand, May 4, 2010.

“As we seek to curb the production and test of nuclear weapons, we must strengthen international peace and security so as to avoid temptation of their use. No nuclear weapons state can design or develop new types of nuclear weapons without testing them. Nothing can effectively boost nuclear non-proliferation than the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).

"Namibia believes that the entry into force of the CTBT is the first step to effective nuclear disarmament and would greatly enhance the international regime for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. In this connection, we urge those who have not yet ratified the CTBT especially the Annex 2 states to do so.”
- Mr. Utoni Nujoma, MP, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Namibia, May 4, 2010.

“Our common task for the forthcoming month is to work out decisions that would reaffirm the role of the Treaty as the proper basis for addressing the current challenges and threats to non-proliferation, determine the instruments for improvement and universalization of the IAEA's safeguards system, facilitate the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty….”
- Sergey A. Ryabkov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Russia, May 4, 2010.

“The Coalition has serious concerns regarding the continued existence of nuclear weapons so long after the entry into force of the Treaty. Furthermore the CTBT has as yet not entered into force… [This is a] serious [matter] that deserves our urgent attention.”
- Ambassador Hisham Badr, Permanent Representative of Egypt to the United Nations in Geneva, on behalf of the New Agenda Coalition, May 4, 2010.

“Fourthly, Japan strongly calls for an early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). We welcome yesterday's announcement by Indonesia to initiate a process of the ratification of the CTBT. Japan values such an action, which will strengthen the momentum for the early entry into force of the Treaty.”
- H.E. Mr.Tetsuro Fukuyama, State Secretary for Foreign Affairs of Japan, on behalf of Prime Minister Dr. Yukio Hatoyama, May 4, 2010.

“In the same vein, Zambia looks forward to the signing and ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty by Annex 2 states for it to enter into force without further delay.”
- Hon. Fashion Phiri MP, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Zambia, May 4, 2010.

“First, my delegation firmly believes that further progress in nuclear disarmament is imperative for the integrity and legitimacy of the NPT. We welcome the New START Treaty between the Russian Federation and the United States as a starting point to facilitate the goal of general and complete disarmament. We also reiterate the importance of an entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)…without further delay.”
- H.E. Mr. Cho Hyun, Deputy Minister for Multilateral and Global Affairs, The Republic of Korea (South Korea), May 4, 2010.

“Other necessary steps towards nuclear disarmament include… The early entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty…Greece has ratified the CTBT and calls for its early entry into force. The fruition of this long awaited goal will be an accomplishment of monumental value for our common efforts towards nuclear disarmament. We urge the nine states whose ratification is still required to redouble their efforts to complete the requirements.
-H.E. Ambassador Anastassis Mitsialis, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Greece, May 4, 2010.

“And even though we have seen great progress in the bilateral US-Russian arms control process, we are still held back by the impasse in multilateral bodies such as the Conference on Disarmament (CD), and the continued inability to achieve entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)…We must make real progress towards entry into force of the CTBT.”
-State Secretary Gry Larsen, Norway, May 4, 2010.

“We see responsibility for implementing the NPT's disarmament obligation lying not only with the five nuclear powers. It is unacceptable that the Geneva Conference on Disarmament has been inactive for years, that the ban on the production of further weapons-grade fissile material has made no progress, and that the continuing refusal by a number of countries to ratify the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty is preventing it from entering into force. We therefore expressly welcome Indonesia's intention to ratify the Treaty soon. This is an important signal to those states that are still hesitating.”
- Dr. Werner Hoyer, Minister of State at the Foreign Office of Germany, May 4, 2010.

“All nuclear-weapon states should fulfill in good faith obligations under article VI of the NPT, and publicly undertake not to seek permanent possession of nuclear weapons. We welcome the recent signing of the new bilateral nuclear disarmament treaty between the United States and the Russian Federation. As countries with largest nuclear arsenals, the two should continue to make drastic reductions in their nuclear arsenals in a verifiable and irreversible manner, which will contribute to creating conditions for the ultimate realization of complete and thorough nuclear disarmament. The entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty at an early date, and the early commencement of negotiations on the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty are of great importance to advancing the nuclear disarmament process. The international community should continue to make even greater efforts to this end…China supports the early entry into force of the CTBT…”
- H.E. Ambassador Li Baodong, China, May 4, 2010.

“We ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) twelve years ago already and dismantled our test centres…But I wish to stress the importance of strengthening the non-proliferation regime by making the CTBT enter into force and starting negotiations on a Cut-off Treaty. In this respect, France welcomes the announcement made yesterday by Indonesia of its intention to launch the process of ratification of the CTBT. I also recall that France is co-chairing with Morocco, since September 2009, the so-called "Article XIV conference" which promotes the entry into force of the CTBT.”
-Ambassador Eric Danon, Permanent Representative of France to the Conference on Disarmament, May 4, 2010.

“Strengthening the international disarmament and non proliferation regime requires, in Italy's view, additional - but very important - steps. The first is the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. This Treaty has not yet entered into force due to the so far insufficient number of ratifications. Italy has ratified the CTBT and desires to see, as soon as possible, its formal entry into force. Once again, we urge those States that have not yet signed the CTBT or that have not yet ratified it, to reassess their position.”
- Prof. Vincenzo Scotti, Undersecretary of State for Foreign Affairs of Italy, May 4, 2010.

“We also acknowledge the efforts of the countries seeking early ratification of the CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) as the progress in this area is imperative for preventing the development of new weapons. We urge the States, particularly those whose adherence is required for the CTBT to enter into force, to sign and ratify the Treaty without delay and without conditions.”
- H.E. Mr. Urmas Paet, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Estonia, May 5, 2010.

“Portugal is a strong supporter of the rapid entry into force of the CTBT. We welcome the commitment by the US Administration to pursue its ratification and we call on all States listed in Annex II which have not yet ratified the Treaty to do so with no further delay. On this matter allow me to extend a warm word of welcome and congratulations to Indonesia, for its recent ratification of the CTBT. Pending the entry into force of this Treaty, Portugal further calls on all States to abide by a moratorium on nuclear test explosions and warmly welcomes the work of the Preparatory Commission, particularly concerning the International Monitoring System, which includes three stations strategically located in the Portuguese islands of the Azores.

The rapid entry into force of the CTBT may also help in creating the momentum and the political confidence necessary to allow progress in drafting a Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty.”
-Mr. João Gomes Cravinho, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Portugal, May 5, 2010.

“Our joint endeavor to stave off any possible nuclear tragedy in the future should be boosted by further strengthening the international legal system in this regard. Let us work towards the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).”
-H.E. Ambassador Nawaf Salam, Permanent Representative of Lebanon to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“On nuclear weapons testing, we should agree on the vital importance of signatures and ratifications, without delay and without conditions and in accordance with constitutional processes, to achieve the soonest entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), as a core element of the international nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament regime.”
-Ambassador Abdul S. Minty, Special Representative for Disarmament and NEPAD, South Africa, May 5, 2010.

“We welcome the latest positive developments in the area of nuclear disarmament, especially… the new US Nuclear Posture Review. which limits the role of nuclear weapons in national doctrines and sets ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) as a priority…Besides a strong call to NPT States Parties to ratify the CTBT and thus enable its entry into force, my Government is also very keen on starting negotiations for a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) in the Conference on Disarmament.”
-H.E. Ms. Sanja Štiglic, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Slovenia to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“We also welcome Indonesia's recent decision to ratify the CTBT…. The decisions reached by the States Parties at the 1995 Review and Extension Conference and the 2000 Review Conference contain important agreements which need followup action (may be with some adjustments), especially implementation of the 13 practical steps agreed upon in 2000. Thus the CTBT has yet to enter into force - we call on all remaining Annex 2 States to speedily ratify the treaty.”
-H.E. Ms. Ochir Enkhtsetseg, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“Similarly, it is important that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) enters into force as soon as possible. We urge all states that have not ratified, particularly those whose ratification is mandatory, to bring it into force as a matter of priority.”
-H.E. Mr. Zachary D. Muburi-Muita, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Kenya to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“We fully support the banning of all nuclear explosions. We believe that the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty is a good complementary Instrument to the NPT.”
-H.E. Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda, Permanent Representative of Uganda to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“Hoping to prevent the production of new nuclear weapons and the improvement of the currently existing ones, as well as liberating the planet from the consequences of radiation, we insist also in thee necessity of achieving a comprehensive ban of all nuclear tests. We must achieve the universalization of Nuclear Test ban Treaty. In this regard, we make a special plea to Annex 2 States to sign and ratify this instrument. While this Treaty comes into force, a moratorium on nuclear tests should be applied.”
-H.E. Mrs. Claudia Blum, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Colombia to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“The African Group is convinced that an early entry into force of the CTBT to enforce a comprehensive ban on all forms of nuclear test explosions is a concrete and meaningful step in the realization of a systematic process to achieve nuclear disarmament. It stresses the significance of achieving universal adherence to the CTBT, including by all Nuclear Weapon States which will contribute to the achievement of Nuclear Disarmament.”
-H.E. Tommo Monthe, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Cameroon on behalf of the African Group States Parties, May 5, 2010.

“We reaffirm our determination to abide by our respective moratoria on nuclear test explosions before entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and call on all States to refrain from conducting a nuclear test explosion. The moratoria, though important, are not a substitute for legally binding commitments under the CTBT. We will continue our efforts aimed at early entry into force of the CTBT and achieving its universality and call upon all States that have not yet done so to sign and ratify this Treaty.”
-Statement on behalf of the Permanent Five Members of the United Nations Security Council, May 5, 2010.

“We reiterate our demand for the total ban of all nuclear tests and the need for reaching universal adherence to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), particularly by all nuclear weapon States and Annex 2 States, and in that regard we call for the upholding and maintenance of the moratorium on such tests or any other nuclear explosions pending the entry into force of the Treaty”
-Ambassador Alfredo Labbe, Director of International and Human Security of Chile on behalf of the States Parties and Signatories that establish Nuclear Weapon Free Zones and Mongolia, May 5, 2010.

“As a State Party to the CTBT, we are heartened by the United States' announcement that it will pursue ratification of the Treaty, and urge other non-States Parties, especially those listed in Annex II, to do the same.”
-H.E. Ambassador Christian Wenaweser, Permanent Representative of Liechtenstein to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“A building block of nuclear disarmament and a prime objective of the NPT is the CTBT. Along with the other EU Member States, as well as with other countries, Malta has supported the affirmation of the critical importance of the early entry into force of the CTBT. Malta also urges all States, pending its entry into force, to maintain a moratorium on nuclear tests explosions and to refrain from any actions which are contrary to the obligations and provisions of the CTBT. The cessation of nuclear weapons test explosions is a meaningful step in the realisation of a systematic process to achieve nuclear disarmament.”
-H.E. Mr. Saviour F. Borg, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Malta to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) is the important component of the international security architecture. We have repeatedly called on the states for its earliest entry into force. We are confident that the ratification of CTBT by the United States will serve as a guiding example for other states and thus facilitate the Treaty's entry into force. We are also encouraged by the announcement of Indonesia that it will soon ratify the Treaty.”
-H.E. Ms. Byrganym Aitimova, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Kazakhstan to the United Nations, May 5, 2010.

“The world has seen some hope that progress in the field of nuclear disarmament can be made, in the light of the positive statements made by some leaders of Nuclear-Weapon States in which they indicated their commitments to work towards the achievement of the desired goal, namely the establishment of world free form nuclear weapons, and the declaration by the President of the United States, Mr. Obama, that his country is committed to work towards the ratification of the CTBT, and the continuation of the negotiations on FMCT.”
-H.E. Abdurrahman M. Shalgham, Permanent Representative and Head of the Libya Delegation, May 5, 2010.

“Chile -which in general endorses the views expressed by Indonesia on behalf of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries -proposes that…we should reaffirm the need for the speedy entry into force of the CTBT…”
-Ambassador Alfredo Labbe, Chile, May 6, 2010.

“I wish to conclude by pointing out that Ghana is of the view that in order to give effective meaning to global efforts aimed at eliminating all weapons of mass destruction, it is necessary for all states, whether powerful or weak, rich or poor, to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT), as well as all other related treaties concluded to facilitate and accelerate the process of nuclear disarmament. It is only through the universal adherence to the international nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regimes that the spread of nuclear weapons can be curbed and the preservation of mankind can be guaranteed.”
-H.E. Mr. Leslie K. Christian, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“Bearing in mind that disarmament and security issues represent responsibility of all states, Montenegro is aware of the importance of the activities that are undertaken in order to promote and advocate an early entry into force of CTBT. As a contracting party to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, Montenegro advocates its expeditious entry into force, welcomes the ratification of CTBT by three States in 2009 and the annunciation of the USA ratification.”
-H.E. Mr. Milorad Šćepanović, Permanent Representative of Montenegro to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“We are also urging all states that have not yet done so, to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) without delay and without conditions. It especially applies to the states listed in Annex II of the CTBT. We are encouraged by the announcements by the US Administration that efforts will be made in order to secure ratification of the CTBT in US Congress, and statements by several other Annex II countries on their readiness to ratify the Treaty. Pending its entry into force, Croatia welcomes the decision of all states concerned to observe a moratorium on nuclear weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosion.”
-H.E. Mr. Mario Nobilo, Director-General, Directorate for Multilateral Affairs, Croatia, May 6, 2010.

“In this regard, we urge all NWS and Annex 2 countries that have not yet ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) to do so quickly, and we applaud Indonesia's decision to initiate the process of CTBT ratification.”
-Ambassador Vanu Gopala Menon, Permanent Representative of Singapore to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“Turkey also continues to support the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this regard, we are encouraged by the announcement of Indonesia on its initiation of ratification process of the Treaty. We call on all States that have not yet signed or ratified the Treaty to do so as soon as possible - in particular those states whose ratification is required for its entry into force. Pending that, States should continue to abide by a moratorium and refrain from any acts contrary to the provisions of the CTBT.”
-H.E. Ambassador Ferídun Sínírlíoğlu, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey, May 6, 2010.

“Again on the issue of disarmament, one of the objectives of the CTBT is to enforce a comprehensive ban on all forms of nuclear tests without exception and to stop the development of nuclear weapons. The continued existence of nuclear weapons represents a significant threat to humanity. My sub region within Asia, the Pacific was used as testing grounds. We have had experiences of atmospheric as well as under ground nuclear testing by a number of nuclear weapons states. Populations today continue to suffer from the impact of the nuclear tests.”
-H.E. Mr. Collin Beck, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Solomon Islands to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“We support the 13 practical steps agreed during the 2000 NPT Review Conference and encourage implementation of these steps. In this context, Sri Lanka is also committed to the CTBT and the early entry into force of this instrument…We believe that these instruments would assist in controlling the proliferation of nuclear arsenals.”
-H.E. Dr. Palitha T. B. Kohona, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“We consider that the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty constitutes an essential part of the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime and its timely entry into force shall constitute a top priority for all States Parties. Following this line, we welcome the commitments of the United States and Indonesia towards the ratification of the Treaty and hope that this will give a positive impulse to the remaining Annex II states to sign and ratify the CTBT.”
-H.E. Mr. Alexandru Cijba, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Moldova, May 6, 2010.

“The entry into force of the CTBT would be a major contribution toward the world peace and security. We call upon all states that have not yet signed the CTBT, or have not yet ratified it, to do so as soon as possible.”
-H.E. Mr. Ferit Hoxha, Permanent Representative of Albania to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“The entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is of the highest priority. The universal banning of nuclear explosions will inhibit the development of nuclear weapons, and thus will contribute to nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation and will prevent further damage to the environment.”
- H.E. Archbishop Celestino Migliore, Permanent Observer of the Holy See, May 6, 2010.

“In conclusion, we believe every effort must be made to bring into force the provisions of the CTBT. While Papua New Guinea is not an Annex II Country it is now in the process of formally ratifying the CTBT which it has signed to previously. In this regard, let me also commend Indonesia for its intention to ratify the CTBT.”
- H.E. Mr. Robert G. Aisi, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Papua New Guinea to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“Botswana also participates in the nuclear test-ban verification regime currently known as the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. My delegation is concerned that even to date, the CTBT has not yet entered into force as some holdout states, whose ratification is a precondition for the entry into force of the Treaty, are yet to sign and ratify it. Botswana views ratification of the CTBT as an important step in strengthening the verification regime, which also serves as an effective deterrent against covert nuclear armaments programmes.”
- Mr. Phologo J. Gaumakwe, Permanent Mission of the Republic of Botswana to the United Nations, May 6, 2010.

“We would like to take this opportunity to renew our support for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), which we signed on September 20, 1999, and that we wish to ratify promptly.”
- Mr. José Alberto Briz Gutiérrez, Deputy Permanent Representative, Guatemala, May 6, 2010.