Login/Logout

*
*  

"I greatly appreciate your very swift response, and your organization's work in general. It's a terrific source of authoritative information."

– Lisa Beyer
Bloomberg News
August 27, 2018
Reports

Updated ACA Report: "Assessing Progress on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Disarmament: 2010-2013 Report Card"

By Kelsey Davenport and Marcus Taylor

 

Table of Contents

Solving the Iranian Nuclear Puzzle: An ACA Briefing Book

By the Arms Control Association Research Staff
 
As the United States and other international leaders continue to pursue a range of strategies to head-off the possibility of a nuclear-armed Iran, the non-partisan Arms Control Association has produced a comprehensive, entry-level guide to Iran's nuclear program and its capabilities, and the risks, benefits, and limitations of the available policy options.
 
This 42-page briefing book is designed to provide an overview of Iran’s nuclear history, the status of its nuclear program, the role of i

CTBT at 15: Status and Prospects

Organized by the Arms Control Association in partnership with the Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation with financial support from the Government of the United Kingdom.

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) has already helped to bring an end to nuclear testing, reduced nuclear arms competition, and improved global capabilities to detect and deter nuclear testing in the future. But until the CTBT enters into force, the door to renewed testing is still open. Entry into force requires ratification by a handful of key states.

The Nuclear Security Summit: Assessment of National Commitments

By Michelle Cann, Kelsey Davenport and Margaret Balza

The report, published jointly by ACA and PGS, concludes that approximately 80 percent of the 67 national commitments made by 30 global leaders at the 2010 summit in Washington have been completed.

The Seoul Nuclear Security Summit is expected to review states' progress on implementing their commitments and to set the course for future efforts to secure weapons-usable nuclear materials. A third summit is planned for the Netherlands in 2014.

Reducing the Role of Tactical Nuclear Weapons in Europe: Perspectives and Proposals on the NATO Policy Debate

Edited by Paul Ingram and Oliver Meier

The 2010 Nuclear Security Summit: A Status Update

By Robert Golan-Vilella, Michelle Marchesano, and Sarah Williams

In April 2010, forty-seven nations attended the first-ever Nuclear Security Summit in Washington and made commitments to strengthen the global nuclear security regime and reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism. This report tracks those commitments and provides a “status update” on how countries are faring with their commitments one year later. It aims both to highlight the significant progress that has been made in the past year and to provide a basis for looking forward to the 2012 summit in South Korea.

The Case for the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty

Updated November 30, 2010

By Tom Z. Collina, Daryl G. Kimball, and ACA Research Staff

The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) reduces the bloated Russian and American nuclear arsenals, while ensuring the ability of the U.S. to inspect and monitor Russian strategic nuclear forces. This report lays out the arguments in favor of New START ratification, and addresses the arguments of New START critics.

Assessing Progress on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Disarmament: 2009-2010 Report Card

By Peter Crail and ACA Research Staff

Table of Contents

Major Proposals to Strengthen the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty: A Resource Guide for the 2010 Review Conference

By Cole Harvey and ACA Research Staff

This report lays out the debates surrounding this essential treaty on issues such as verification, disarmament, the nuclear fuel cycle, and others.  It includes a detailed pictorial timeline of the NPT, as well key treaty-related documents.  The report is a useful guide for anyone looking to deepen their understanding of this cornerstone of the international nonproliferation regime.

Now More Than Ever: The Case for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

By Tom Z. Collina with Daryl G. Kimball

Nuclear testing is a dangerous and unnecessary vestige of the Cold War that the United States rejected almost 20 years ago. There is no military justification for resuming U.S. testing, and the United States does not need nuclear testing to maintain the effectiveness and reliability of its nuclear deterrent.

The 1996 Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) is an essential part of a commonsense strategy to reduce nuclear dangers.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Reports