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“[My time at ACA] prepared me very well for the position that I took following that with the State Department, where I then implemented and helped to implement many of the policies that we tried to promote.”
– Peter Crail
Business Executive for National Security
June 2, 2022
U.S. Nuclear Policy & Budget
  • October 15, 2020

    The Trump administration again shifts its arm control framework deal with Russia. Congressional and international support for New START continues to grow. States-parties of the Open Skies Treaty gather for review conference.

  • October 7, 2020

    The stakes could not be higher. The untimely death of New START with nothing to replace it would open the door to a costly and dangerous new quantitative U.S.-Russian nuclear arms race.

  • October 1, 2020

    The Trump administration is pressing to replace U.S. ICBMs.

  • September 21, 2020
  • July 28, 2020

    Seventy-five years ago, the nuclear age began with the world's first nuclear weapons test explosion in the New Mexico desert. In this annotated "silent film"-style video essay from the Arms Control Association, we learn about the events that transpired three weeks later with the atomic attacks on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  • June 10, 2020
  • May 6, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is reshaping thinking about national security and geopolitics Understanding these changes is crucial to how we—as advocates, analysts, educators, and engaged citizens—respond.

  • April 23, 2020

    The United States may begin the process to withdraw from the Open Skies Treaty soon. With the fate of New START still undecided, President Trump names a special representative for arms control and continues pushing for a trilateral arms control agreement that includes Russia and China. Russia tests an anti-satellite missile, according to U.S. Space Command.

  • April 1, 2020

    The New START agreement is now the only treaty capping the world’s two largest nuclear weapons arsenals—and it is in jeopardy. The U.S. and Russian presidents can extend it—and its irreplaceable verification and monitoring system—for up to five years if they choose. The actions of Congress can help protect and extend it. (February 2020)

  • April 1, 2020

    For decades, national security and health experts have warned of the risks of global threats that are simply too big for one country to handle, such as disease pandemics, climate change, and nuclear war. For many years, the response of our national and global leaders has fallen short.

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