ACA’s journal, Arms Control Today, remains the best in the market. Well focused. Solidly researched. Prudent.

– Hans Blix,
former IAEA Director-General

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive Director

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive Director
(High Resolution Photo)
Daryl G. Kimball became the Executive Director of the Arms Control Association in September 2001. The Arms Control Association (ACA) is a private, non-profit membership organization dedicated to public education and support of effective arms control measures pertaining to nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons.

Mr. Kimball is a frequent source for reporters and has written and spoken extensively about nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, and weapons production. In 2004, National Journal recognized Kimball as one of the ten key individuals whose ideas will help shape the policy debate on the future of nuclear weapons.

From 1997 to 2001, Kimball was the executive director of the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of 17 of the largest U.S. non-governmental organizations working together to strengthen national and international security by reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons. While at the Coalition, Kimball coordinated community-wide education, research and lobbying campaigns for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, further deep and verifiable reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, and against the deployment of an unproven and ineffective national missile defense system.

From 1989-1997, Kimball worked as the Associate Director for Policy and later, the Director of Security Programs for Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). While at PSR, Kimball organized media, lobbying and public education campaigns against nuclear weapons production and testing, and research projects on the health and environmental impacts of the nuclear arms race. Through PSR, Kimball helped spearhead non-governmental efforts to win Congressional approval for the 1992 nuclear test moratorium legislation, to extend the test moratorium in 1993, to win U.S. support for a "zero-yield" test ban treaty, and for the U.N.'s 1996 endorsement of the CTBT.

Daryl Kimball is a 1986 Graduate of Miami University of Ohio. He holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy/Foreign Affairs. He is also a former Herbert R. Scoville Peace Fellow (1989). He lives in Washington, DC with his partner Sally James and their daughter Nola.

Contact Information:
[email protected]

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Recent Publications

  • June 1, 2010

    Iran's renewed interest in an arrangement that would move 1,200 kilograms of its low-enriched uranium (LEU) to Turkey as part of a nuclear fuel exchange brokered by the leaders of Brazil and Turkey has been dubbed by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as a “transparent ploy” designed to head off a new round of UN Security Council sanctions. That may be true, but the United States should still seriously pursue the deal as a means to help resolve the impasse over Tehran’s nuclear program. (Continue)

  • May 12, 2010

    Volume 1, Number 3

    Eighteen years after the last U.S. nuclear test, it is abundantly clear that maintaining the reliability of existing U.S. nuclear warheads does not depend on a program of nuclear test explosions. Over the past decade the U.S. Life Extension Program has successfully refurbished major warhead types, and with sufficient resources can continue to do so indefinitely.

  • May 5, 2010

    On April 5, 2009, in Prague, President Barack Obama embraced the goal of a world without nuclear weapons. In pursuit of that objective, he called for “an end to Cold War thinking” and pledged to “reduce the role of nuclear weapons in [U.S.] national security strategy.”[1] One year later, his administration released its Nuclear Posture Review (NPR), which fleshes out policies to meet those aspirations.

    The new NPR narrows the circumstances under which the United States might use nuclear weapons and formally establishes some commonsense constraints on U.S. nuclear warhead modernization. It does so in ways that should help reduce the salience of nuclear weapons, help curb proliferation, and open the way for further nuclear arms cuts.

  • April 29, 2010

    Once again the nuclear nonproliferation system is facing a crisis of confidence. New measures to update and strengthen the 1968 nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) are needed. The May 2010 treaty review conference provides an important opportunity for the pact’s 189 members to adopt a balanced action plan to improve nuclear safeguards, guard against treaty withdrawal, accelerate progress on disarmament, and address regional proliferation challenges. (Continue)

  • April 27, 2010

    Volume 1, Number 1

    Hillary Clinton recently met with the foreign ministers of various NATO allies in Tallinn, Estonia. They discussed the future of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe. NATO no longer needs these weapons, and the U.S. decision to link their removal to Russian actions is disappointing.