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ACA’s journal, Arms Control Today, remains the best in the market. Well focused. Solidly researched. Prudent.

– Hans Blix,
former IAEA Director-General

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive Director

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive Director
(High Resolution Photo)
Daryl G. Kimball became the Executive Director of the Arms Control Association in September 2001. The Arms Control Association (ACA) is a private, non-profit membership organization dedicated to public education and support of effective arms control measures pertaining to nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons.
 

Mr. Kimball is a frequent source for reporters and has written and spoken extensively about nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, and weapons production. In 2004, National Journal recognized Kimball as one of the ten key individuals whose ideas will help shape the policy debate on the future of nuclear weapons.

From 1997 to 2001, Kimball was the executive director of the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of 17 of the largest U.S. non-governmental organizations working together to strengthen national and international security by reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons. While at the Coalition, Kimball coordinated community-wide education, research and lobbying campaigns for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, further deep and verifiable reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, and against the deployment of an unproven and ineffective national missile defense system.

From 1989-1997, Kimball worked as the Associate Director for Policy and later, the Director of Security Programs for Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). While at PSR, Kimball organized media, lobbying and public education campaigns against nuclear weapons production and testing, and research projects on the health and environmental impacts of the nuclear arms race. Through PSR, Kimball helped spearhead non-governmental efforts to win Congressional approval for the 1992 nuclear test moratorium legislation, to extend the test moratorium in 1993, to win U.S. support for a "zero-yield" test ban treaty, and for the U.N.'s 1996 endorsement of the CTBT.

Daryl Kimball is a 1986 Graduate of Miami University of Ohio. He holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy/Foreign Affairs. He is also a former Herbert R. Scoville Peace Fellow (1989). He lives in Washington, DC with his partner Sally James and their daughter Nola.

Contact Information:
[email protected]
202-463-8270

Follow him on Twitter or connect with him on LinkedIn.


Recent Publications

  • April 20, 2012

    Volume 3, Issue 6, April 20, 2012

    In the next few weeks, the Republican leadership on the House Armed Services Committee is expected to try to block implementation of the New START Treaty unless the Obama administration agrees to further increase spending on the U.S. nuclear weapons infrastructure. This type of partisan "hostage taking" threatens to undermine U.S. national security, ignores budget reality, and defies common sense.

  • April 3, 2012

    A U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committee report reviewing technical issues related to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) has concluded that the U.S. nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship Program “has been more successful than was anticipated in 1999,” when the Senate last considered and voted on the CTBT.

  • April 2, 2012

    Preventing the spread and buildup of nuclear weapons remains one of the highest priority international security challenges. Success depends on a multipronged global strategy, including a verifiable ban on nuclear explosive testing to prevent the emergence of new and more deadly nuclear weapons. U.S. leadership is critical.

  • March 30, 2012

    Volume 3, Issue 5, March 30, 2012

    Today, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released its long-awaited report on technical issues related to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The independent panel of senior scientific and military experts was charged in 2009 with reviewing technical developments related to the U.S. nuclear stockpile and to nuclear explosion test monitoring that have occurred since the 2002 NAS report on the CTBT and the Senate's brief debate and rejection of the treaty in 1999.

  • March 30, 2012

    Volume 3, Issue 6, March 30, 2012

    The March 30 release of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report, The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty--Technical Issues for the United States lays out the most compelling case to date, based on the latest classified and intelligence information, that the United States does not need nuclear tests to maintain its arsenal and that the Test Ban Treaty can be verified.

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