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Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty

  • Arms Control Today
    June 2, 2014

    Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty members met in New York, but disagreed on disarmament steps and other issues, setting up a possible showdown at the treaty’s review conference one year from now.

  • Press Room
    May 16, 2014

    (Washington, D.C.) A new article published in the May issue of Arms Control Today finds that the world's nine nuclear-armed states still possess more than 10,000 nuclear warheads combined, and are all seeking to modernize their arsenals. According to the article, the trend has riled a growing number of signatories to the 1968 nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which obligates states to eliminate their nuclear arsenals.

  • Arms Control Today
    May 1, 2014

    All of the world’s nuclear-armed states are busy modernizing their nuclear forces for the long haul. Non-nuclear-weapon states can rightly question whether continued nuclear modernization in perpetuity is consistent with the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

  • Arms Control Today
    May 1, 2014

    Meeting for the fourth time since the 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference, the five countries that the treaty recognizes as nuclear-weapon states met in Beijing on April 14 and 15 to review their progress toward fulfilling the nuclear disarmament commitments they made at the 2010 conference.

  • Fact Sheets & Briefs
    March 11, 2014

    March 2014

  • Fact Sheets & Briefs
    February 4, 2014

    February 2014

  • Threat Assessment Brief
    July 24, 2013

    Preventing the production and accumulation of fissile material is an important objective of nuclear nonproliferation efforts. Unfortunately, the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) exempts the fuel used in naval propulsion reactors from the constraints the treaty otherwise applies to enriching uranium beyond the levels used in civilian power reactors. As the number of countries with nuclear-powered submarines expands, this exclusionposes a growing risk to achieving the nonproliferation goals of the treaty.

  • Arms Control Today
    July 2, 2013

    The U.S. government is “cautiously optimistic” that the parties to the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) will be able to reach agreement at the treaty’s 2015 review conference on “a meaningful way” to respond to countries that withdraw from the pact, a senior U.S. official said June 18.

  • Arms Control Today
    May 2, 2013

    The five countries that the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) recognizes as nuclear-weapon states last month “expressed their shared disappointment” that the Conference on Disarmament (CD) has not agreed to negotiate an international ban on the production of fissile material for use in nuclear weapons and “reiterated their support for the immediate start of negotiations” in the CD.

  • Threat Assessment Brief
    July 25, 2012

    A long submerged flaw in the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) surfaced conspicuously in June when Iran announced it intended to build a nuclear-powered submarine. The treaty does not ban a non-nuclear weapons state's production of weapons-grade uranium if it is to be used to power a naval reactor.

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