ACA Logo
Adjust Text Size: Small Text Size Default Text Size Large Text Size

Daryl G. Kimball

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive DirectorDaryl Kimball became the Executive Director of the Arms Control Association in September 2001. The Arms Control Association (ACA) is a private, non-profit membership organization dedicated to public education and support of effective arms control measures pertaining to nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons.

ACA, formed in 1971, is a leading source of information and analysis for the news media and policy-makers on arms control and non-proliferation matters. Kimball is also the chief editorial advisor and a contributor to ACA's magazine, Arms Control Today, widely considered to be the journal of record in the field.

Mr. Kimball is a frequent source for reporters and has written and spoken extensively about nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, and weapons production. In 2004, National Journal recognized Kimball as one of the ten key individuals whose ideas will help shape the policy debate on the weapons proliferation.

Background: From 1997 to 2001, Kimball was the executive director of the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of 17 of the largest U.S. non-governmental organizations working together to strengthen national and international security by reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons. While at the Coalition, Kimball coordinated community-wide education, research and lobbying campaigns for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, further deep and verifiable reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, and against the deployment of an unproven and ineffective national missile defense system.

From 1989-1997, Kimball worked as the Associate Director for Policy and later, the Director of Security Programs for Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). While at PSR, Kimball organized media, lobbying and public education campaigns against nuclear weapons production and testing, and research projects on the health and environmental impacts of the nuclear arms race. Through PSR, Kimball helped spearhead non-governmental efforts to win Congressional approval for the 1992 nuclear test moratorium legislation, to extend the test moratorium in 1993, to win U.S. support for a "zero-yield" test ban treaty, and for the U.N.'s 1996 endorsement of the CTBT.

Daryl Kimball is a 1986 Graduate of Miami University of Ohio. He holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy/Foreign Affairs. He is also a former Herbert R. Scoville Peace Fellow (1989).

He lives in Washington D.C. with his partner Sally James and their daughter Nola.

Read more by Daryl G. Kimball:

  • Arms Control Today
    August 30, 2011

    Jonathan B. Tucker, a member of the Arms Control Association Board of Directors and leading biological and chemical weapons expert, died recently at his home in Washington, D.C. He will be deeply missed. His departure leaves a tremendous vacuum in the field of biological and chemical weapons arms control.

  • Arms Control Today
    August 30, 2011

    Mark O. Hatfield, the former Republican senator from Oregon, died August 7 in Portland at the age of 89. He was a political maverick, a pragmatic idealist who worked across the aisle to take on big issues, including the long-running U.S. war in Vietnam, the insanity of the nuclear arms race, excessive military spending, and the global arms trade.

  • Arms Control Today
    August 30, 2011

    Each year, thousands of civilians around the world are slaughtered by weapons sold to unscrupulous regimes and transferred to criminals and illegal militias. The enormous human toll of this cycle of violence undermines economic development and political stability in fragile regions.

  • Arms Control Today
    July 7, 2011

    Senior officials from the five original nuclear-weapon states—China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—reaffirmed their commitment to the 64-point action plan agreed at the 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference and “called on all States Parties to the NPT to work together to advance its implementation,” according to a July 1 joint press statement at the end of a two-day meeting in Paris.

  • Arms Control Today
    July 6, 2011

    After years of discussion, the 46-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) has agreed on a clearer, tougher set of guidelines designed to prevent the spread of uranium-enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing equipment and technology. The action should help guard against the further proliferation of sensitive equipment and technology that can be used to make fissile material for nuclear weapons.