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Daryl G. Kimball

Daryl G. Kimball, Executive DirectorDaryl Kimball became the Executive Director of the Arms Control Association in September 2001. The Arms Control Association (ACA) is a private, non-profit membership organization dedicated to public education and support of effective arms control measures pertaining to nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons.

ACA, formed in 1971, is a leading source of information and analysis for the news media and policy-makers on arms control and non-proliferation matters. Kimball is also the chief editorial advisor and a contributor to ACA's magazine, Arms Control Today, widely considered to be the journal of record in the field.

Mr. Kimball is a frequent source for reporters and has written and spoken extensively about nuclear arms control and non-proliferation, and weapons production. In 2004, National Journal recognized Kimball as one of the ten key individuals whose ideas will help shape the policy debate on the weapons proliferation.

Background: From 1997 to 2001, Kimball was the executive director of the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of 17 of the largest U.S. non-governmental organizations working together to strengthen national and international security by reducing the threats posed by nuclear weapons. While at the Coalition, Kimball coordinated community-wide education, research and lobbying campaigns for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, further deep and verifiable reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, and against the deployment of an unproven and ineffective national missile defense system.

From 1989-1997, Kimball worked as the Associate Director for Policy and later, the Director of Security Programs for Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR). While at PSR, Kimball organized media, lobbying and public education campaigns against nuclear weapons production and testing, and research projects on the health and environmental impacts of the nuclear arms race. Through PSR, Kimball helped spearhead non-governmental efforts to win Congressional approval for the 1992 nuclear test moratorium legislation, to extend the test moratorium in 1993, to win U.S. support for a "zero-yield" test ban treaty, and for the U.N.'s 1996 endorsement of the CTBT.

Daryl Kimball is a 1986 Graduate of Miami University of Ohio. He holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy/Foreign Affairs. He is also a former Herbert R. Scoville Peace Fellow (1989).

He lives in Washington D.C. with his partner Sally James and their daughter Nola.

Read more by Daryl G. Kimball:

  • Arms Control Today
    May 1, 2014

    Israel appears to be signaling that it is seriously considering ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  • Arms Control Today
    April 30, 2014

    Proliferation prevention requires a comprehensive approach, involving multiple barriers against the acquisition and further development of nuclear weapons. Nowhere is this more apparent and necessary than the Middle East, which already has one undeclared nuclear-armed state—Israel—and another state with the capacity to build nuclear weapons if it were to choose to do so—Iran.

  • ACA Events
    April 28, 2014

    We are one year away from the 2015 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, and the global nuclear disarmament and risk reduction enterprise is at yet another important crossroads. The situation requires that the states gathered here must seriously consider, explore, and pursue alternative options to reduce global nuclear dangers and jumpstart progress toward the fulfillment of the ambitious 2010 NPT Action Plan.

  • ACA Events
    April 23, 2014

    Since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the catastrophic effects of nuclear weapons have driven global leaders to pursue concrete steps to reduce the threat of nuclear weapons use.

  • Arms Control Today
    April 1, 2014

    John B. Rhinelander, a key figure in the negotiation of the first Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) agreement and the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and a long-time member of the Arms Control Association Board of Directors, died unexpectedly on March 2.